Categories

Aug 18, 2019

Not-So-Scrappy Scrap Blankets

As much as I love the look of a nicely executed scrap blanket, you might have noticed random is not a thing I do well. 

Unfortunately like most knitters, I have an abundance of scraps, leftovers and partials tucked in the stash. The challenge for me, therefore, has been to create a variety of ways to put these leftovers to good use. These afghan designs have helped me do just that, and they might help you do the same.


Angletyn



Worked on the bias, Angletyn's large-scale chevron design is highly adaptable. If you have lots of leftovers of similar weight, simply arrange the colors in a sequence you find visually pleasing, then knit each strip in a series of two-row stripes. If you have varied scrap amounts, try knitting stripes of different depths based on how much you have of each color. 


Color Check



Designed as a multi-color project, Color Check features a simple slip stitch that's ideally suited to burning through scraps and leftovers. Pick a unifying color for the check outlines and use scraps and leftovers for the fill colors. Since this reversible design consists of two panels seamed together, you can change colors as often as you choose without worrying about lots of ends to weave  simply bury them inside.


Drumlin



Worked with another easy slip stitch, Drumlin is a versatile, quick knit and is fully reversible. The stitch creates a fluted texture on both sides, and its attractive worked in a single solid color or in alternating two-row stripes. For each strip, try pairing two solid colors (like the example above) or match a solid with a complementary confetti, speckled or variegated yarn.


Herlacyn (pattern coming soon!)



From the beginning, Herlacyn was designed to help use up some of the many partial skeins lingering in the stash. In the example shown, colors were arranged in a diagonal pattern to create an ombre or gradient effect, but there are countless ways to adapt this pattern to accommodate yarn on hand. Try working the triangles in a single contrasting solid, rich or bright rainbow colors, or various shades from the same color family.


Lucben



Worked in strips rather than individual blocks, Lucben offers a fresh take on the timeless look of a classic 9-patch blanket. You can do what I did and mix various shades from the same color family to create a custom gradient, or choose a light and dark color, then alternate them for a checkerboard effect. Try a tonal approach using closely related hues for the blocks and borders, or try a simple two-color strategy, using one for the blocks and the other for the borders


Tikkyn


With its charming pindot stitch, Tikkyn offers a host of scrap-busting possibilities. Keep the emphasis on the cozy texture by working each strip in a different color. Tone down a busy variegated, speckled or confetti yarn by pairing it with a related solid shade. To accommodate different amounts of yarn, try working long stretches in one color combination and shorter sections in another, similar to Tikkyn Flagstone.


Twegen



Worked in yet another reversible slip stitch, Twegen is an attractive, easy way to put leftovers and partials to good use. For an interesting effect, choose a unifying main color and work each strip with that and a mix of colorful scraps and leftovers, both solid and variegated. For lighter weight yarns, try multistranding to create a fun marled fabric. For an ombre effect, sort yarns by color family and work each strip with the darkest shades at the bottom, medium ones in the middle, and lightest ones at the top.


Valere



With its compact geometric shapes, Valere readily lends itself to scrap-busting. Try a strategy similar to the one shown above, using a single color for the background and vivid contrasting colors for the banners or flags. If you have a lot of similar leftovers in a single color family, work all the banners in these varied shades. To use up small bits of yarn, work the banners in alternating two-row stripes. 


Keep in mind most of these ideas will work with a wide range of patterns. While you think about what type of scrap-busting project you prefer, take time to organize and inventory your scraps, leftovers and partials. That alone may be enough to prompt ideas and inspiration.

Some knitters, of course, are hyper-organized with yarny leftovers, but I'm not one of them. If I have lots of a specific type (I'm looking at you Cotton Fleece), I store all of them in the same small bin. With more limited leftovers, I tend to tuck them in with other yarns of the same or similar weight and fiber makeup, while super-small quantities often live out their last days snuggled with other small bits in a plastic container or ziploc bag.

Whatever you choose to do, I hope you found some of these tips useful. Each pattern highlighted here includes directions for three sizes (baby, lapghan, throw), along with detailed yardage breakouts, and easy modifications to help you transform all the yarn into something pretty and practical. Happy not-so-scrappy knitting! 


Aug 11, 2019

FO | Herlacyn Breeze Afghan

I'm delighted to report my Herlacyn Breeze afghan is finished. Blocking worked its usual magic, so stitches have relaxed, small bumps have disappeared, seams are straighter, and the borders lay flat.



Worked in Cotton Fleece (Brown Sheep), this version features a cool gradient with six shades ranging from rich purple to mint green set against a neutral off-white background. The colors are arranged on the diagonal from the lower left to upper right, and they were worked in this order:
  • Left strip: Sugar Plum, Lapis, Caribbean Sea, Hawaiian Sky
  • Center strip: Lapis, Caribbean Sea, Hawaiian Sky, Light Sage
  • Right strip: Caribbean Sea, Hawaiian Sky, Light Sage, Mint

From the beginning, Herlacyn was designed as a stashbusting alternative to a scrapghan, using partials and leftovers from projects such as Lucben TidepoolValere Summer Rainbow and Tikkyn Rainbow.



Herlacyn Breeze
Pattern: Coming soon!
Yarn: Cotton Fleece (Brown Sheep)
Needles: US 8 (5.5 mm)
Size: Small / baby
Dimensions: 27 x 35 ins
Yardage: ~670 yards

Twisted stitches create a subtle texture on the front and an interesting texture on the back, while the colored triangles almost appear appliqued rather than worked as part of the fabric.


Much like its sibling Herlacyn HeatwaveBreeze has fantastic drape. It's also the ideal weight for chilly weather, so it will be perfect as we transition into fall, when a soft, light lapghan is welcome on a cool morning.

This project lingered way too long in its almost-done state, so it's exceptionally satisfying to finally have it completed. With one long-standing WIP now officially a finished object, it's time ot tackle the others skulking in the background!


Looking for the pattern? It's with the tech editor for a final review, so it's coming soon!

Aug 4, 2019

Let the Finishing Begin

Turns out, there's nothing quite so potent as making a public promise to finish a few WIPs to prompt some action. It also helps that like a parent waving a lollipop in front of a wayward toddler, my reward for keeping that promise is the opportunity to cast on the rainbow shawl I've been craving. 

This week, I buckled down and wove in the last of the ends on my Herlacyn Breeze. It's soaking now in preparation for blocking, which I hope to tackle this evening.



Dazzling progress? No, but for a project that's been stalled for far too long, it's a start, and I'll take it.


Looking for the pattern? It's in my tech editor's capable hands, so it should be ready for release soon.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...