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Mar 22, 2013

FO | What's Red, White & Reversible?

Isn’t it funny how you can tootle along, knitting what you knit and ignoring everything else? Then one day for no special reason that changes.

Dishcloths are the perfect example. For years, I didn’t get this phenomenon. Why would anyone use valuable knitting time to make something that would be subjected to constant wear, tear and abuse?

Recently, I’ve discovered what others have known all along. It’s rather satisfying to knit dishcloths, hotpads and blanket squares. The small size and limited scope are the ideal way to test new stitches or knit familiar ones when your eyes, hands and mind need a break.

It’s swatching, with the added advantage that when the swatch is finished, you can use it rather than stash it in a drawer.



So, while there are a number of projects in various stages of completion (or non-completion, depending on your point of view), this week’s featured FO is the red dishcloth (or hotpad) made to complement the striped cloths and tawashis I made over the Christmas holidays.

My goodness, that's quite an introduction for such a simple item, isn't it? Let’s get down to specifics.



Red, White & Reversible Dishcloths/Hotpads

Reversible Patterns: Reversible stripes; seed and stockinette; barred stripe
Yarn: Four Seasons (Classic Elite)
Weight: Worsted
Yardage: 2-3 skeins (250-270 yards +/-)
Needles: US 7-9 (4.5-5.5mm)
Ravelry Notes: Here and here


I still can’t bear to subject them to daily use, so for now, they’re hanging in the kitchen and adding a spark of much-needed color during these seemingly endless gray days. The calendar may say it’s spring, but the weather insists it’s still winter.

One day soon, I may write up the patterns, if you're interested. 

Meanwhile, to see more finished objects and discover what others are up to, visit Tami's Amis.

12 comments:

  1. Your points are very convincing. :-)

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  2. Yes, please. Do write up the patterns when you can, I'm always looking for reversible stitch patterns. So useful!

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    1. You're right, reversible stitches are so versatile. I'll start pulling my working notes together to translate them into a basic pattern.

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  3. Cute! I've had a kitchen update on the brain for a while now. I should really add some knitted flair to my space.

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    1. Thanks, Michelle. Actually, that need for a quick spark of color to brighten up the kitchen is what started this dishcloth frenzy. Consider yourself forewarned!

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  4. They're cute! I knit dishcloths quite often for just the reasons you mention. But I use all mine. Nothing too pretty for my dishwater :)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm sure I'll start using mine, too ... eventually.

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  5. They're fabulous! I can see how they're addicting :)

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    1. Glad you like them, Stacey. Yep, like amiguri, they're addicting.

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  6. Great post and wonderful looking dishcloths! I love experimenting with reversible stitch patterns, so I hope that you will write up the pattern for these. I have a drawer full of hand knitted dishcloths. They have actually held up a lot longer than any store bought ones.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, autumngeisha. I have a few things to clear off the decks, then I'll tackle the pattern, ok? Good also to know your handmade cloths hold up so well. I'm curious to see how these perform, once I break down and start using them!

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-b

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