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Dec 14, 2014

The Best Gift

Recently, I received one of the best gifts a knitter can get. No it wasn't yarn, or needles or a handcrafted treasure. It was this ...

Following a lovely, relaxed Thanksgiving dinner, the extended family was sitting around the table chatting when my youngest goddaughter poked her dad and tilted her head. (She’s a bit shy in large gatherings.)

Reading his cue accurately, he leaned back in his chair and casually remarked how much she wanted to learn to knit. The oldest GD immediately piped up and said, “Me, too!”

The youngest GD is a true newbie, but technically the two oldest ones know how to knit. When they were young, they used to spend a chunk of time with me every week or two. We’d cook, bake, draw, craft and chat.

Occasionally, we’d pop in a video, light a fire and they would wind yarn while I knit. When they asked, I taught them the basics and we spent one enjoyable Christmas season making scarves for their mom, grandmother and aunt.
                         
They loved to go yarn shopping and feel the different fibers. They also loved untangling, which was fortunate. We bought very soft, very expensive yarn for all the projects, but when we tried to wind the yarn for the aunt’s scarf, we found a snarled mess. We should have returned the skein, but instead we spent an entire evening carefully teasing apart the tangles to salvage enough to finish the project in time for Christmas.

Back to present day. Oldest GD had cleaned out her closet and found a small WIP from long ago, but when she tried to restart it, she no longer remembered the basics. If I was willing, she said, she’d really like a refresher course.

So now, in addition to the flurry of pre-holiday knitting, I’m striving to put together a simple strategy for a series of post-holiday knitting sessions. It's a joy not a burden and I'm glowing like a Christmas tree at the prospect. 


Sometimes the best gift a knitter can get is the chance to spend quality time with beloved godkids ... and begin planting the seeds for a new generation of fiber fanatics.

PS: If you have any hints, tips or suggestions for fast and easy projects for new knitters, please share.

PPS: For the record, I have three goddaughters and one godson ranging in age from 11 to 21.


20 comments:

  1. So sweet! What lucky girls to have you and what a great way to spend special time together!

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    1. Thank you! I feel lucky to have them in my life and treasure the time we spend together.

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  2. My oldest daughter has been asking me to teach her to knit recently, I don't even know where to start! We have accomplished finger knitting, but moving onto needles seems daunting to me. I need a book on how to teach a 6 year old how to knit :-)

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    1. How lovely she wants to learn! Six years old is a challenge, but you'll figure something out I'm sure. If you find a good resource, let us know. I'm sure others would be interested as well.

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  3. Lovely post and what a nice way to spend time together :) Beautiful yarn colours by the way!

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    1. Thank you! Yes, I'm very much looking forward to it as you can tell.

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  4. This is so lovely! Here's hoping the spark stays with them :)

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  5. Aloha,

    Wonderful news about new knitters! Check out Mel's hints: http://withmeldotcom.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/gimme-20-and-ill-make-you-a-superhero/. She has a great site and often offers free patterns too.

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  6. Oh how wonderful! What a lovely godmother you are :)

    Scarves are an obvious easy project, you could add in new stitches as well. Alternatively it depends what other things they enjoy doing. If they have dolls could they knit something for them? Or maybe some knitted animals to play with?

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    1. Aren't you kind?!

      Scarves are a great idea. I'm thinking start very small - coasters, headbands, mitts ...

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  7. I so agree! I haven't taught a little one in a long time. However I like how they can just "get" what you are doing quickly and patiently.

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  8. So glad you have interested ones who want to knit. A rewarding experience, for sure. Good adventures ahead.

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  9. If they can decrease then a cute project is to knit a rectangle, then shape the top to a point by decreasing on both sides. Then fold it to make a little pocket purse. I run a lunchtime school knitting club, though it is hard work with only 30mins once a week. We still haven't progressed to purl yet.

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    1. How lovely that you run the lunchtime knitting group, you're giving the kids an experience they'll always remember. Great suggestion, thank you.

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  10. What a lovely story. I hope this time when she learns to knit, she is inspired to keep knitting. I've tried teaching both of my kids how to spin and knit. They both can use a drop spindle (but choose not to) and get frustrated with knitting (which I explained to them that I did/do too). I explained to them that even though I am obsessed with fiber arts, I don't expect them to be but will gladly teach them when they are ready. Enjoy your post-holiday knitting sessions.

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    1. Thanks for sharing your insights. Yes, I hope they stick with it, but for now I'm simply relishing the prospect of quality, crafty time together. Brings back good memories and hopefully we'll make some new ones.

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-b

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